A Clockwork Orange Essay

1672 words - 7 pages

I. A Clockwork Orange II. Anthony Burgess III. Science-fiction IV. A Clockwork Orange was published in the 60's and was written futuristically to predict a time probably between 1995 and 2000. In retrospect you could say it's set in a present day metropolis. Anthony Burgess the author of this book is a well known writer and best known for this book as well as, The Doctor Is Sick, Honey for the Bears, Nothing like the Sun, Re Joyce, and The Wanting Seed. Although this may be Burgess' best known work he once said this is not the book he holds dearest to him butt he feels an obligation to the book and the people who love it so he doesn't mind being labeled by it.V. A Clockwork Orange is a very concise novel so there are not very many "minor" characters because almost everyone plays an important role in the novel. My best example is Alex's (the main character whose perspective the book is written from) parents. His parents, still married, are thoroughly decent people and have a perfectly normal household. His mother is forever doing kind motherly things for Alex, like leaving little suppers out for him on the table for when he comes back from his criminal adventures. They are, however, very meek; they seem to be frightened of their son and let him bully them. They are frightened of knowing too much about their son's activities. By Alex's parents being so normal it allows the book to relate more directly to the average person.VI. After reading A Clockwork Orange I feel it enlarged my knowledge of human experience, allowed me to learn about different modes of life as well as simply open my horizons. All these events occurred simply by the illustration of what I believe were the major aspects of this book. First Burgess was able to show the way a serial killer thinks through his first person perspective writing allowing me to learn about different modes of life and he opened my horizons of human experience by showing me rebellion redemption and maturity. Ultimately he writes a book about the perils of life the battle of good and evil and what the world could become.Alex, begins the novel by explaining his mischievous exploits in a manner not far from nostalgia, that is tainted with a bit of sarcasm for any bleeding-heart pity one might feel for his victims, as when he recalls his own realization of the importance of the term, "A Clockwork Orange." Alex says of the author and his wife (who are some of his many victims) that he "would like to have tolchocked them harder and ripped them to ribbons on their own floor. (CO 38)" By the manor Alex contemplates this concept with a complete lack of respect for it, Burgess shows Alex's attitude as one of childish ignorance coupled with adolescent induced negative energy. An attitude not absent from any boys upbringing. As Alex is growing through that difficult age known as adolescence, he is rebelling, throwing off the constraints of the previous generation. This is accomplished through...

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