Caribbean Integration Essay

2361 words - 9 pages

CARIBBEAN POLITICS and SOCIETY
Caribbean Integration

Rationale for Integration.
The Caribbean remains fragmented both economically and politically as a result of competition and conflict among the European powers. Fragmentation is in part the product of a long history as separate colonies of a metropolitan power or powers. It is also in part the psychological effects on people of separation by sea.

The case for regional integration is both simple and irrefutable. First we are small and we need to achieve economies of scale. We need to achieve such economies in markets, production, the mobilisation of regional capital for regional use, university education, science and technology, sea and air transport to mention some areas.

We therefore need to pool as far as is feasible our markets and our financial human and natural resources. We need a single unified and truly common market for goods and services, capital, and trained manpower. In addition we need to coordinate not only the development of our productive sectors but also our economic policies. And we need both a common external tariff and a common set of external trade, economic and other policies.

Very basically put, we must come closer together because even the more economically advanced and biggest of us are mere specks of dusts in international terms. To admit that we are specks of dust does not however mean that we should sink ourselves in passive apathy in economic and international matters; rather we should get together to forma an object with more mass and more weight so that our presence could be more easily seen and more effectively used in the promotion of our own interests. We are small states by world and even Hemispheric standards, we are economically and politically weak individual units.

We must avoid the temptation if at any given time our individual national economy is more prosperous than those of our other partner states, to be so arrogant as to forget that our economic situation may be suddenly reversed and that therefore we will soon need close links with our partner states in matters concerning both the intra-regional and extra-regional spheres. West Indian history abounds with instances of countries suffering sudden reversals of their economic fortunes.

Advantages of Integration.
     a stronger voice internationally
(a)     small countries cannot afford to support teams of negotiators.
(b)     a single team representing the region would show a united front and lessen the chance for bilateral arrangements that might lead to self-destructive intra-regional competition
     more control of localregional resources
     less dependency on foreigners; therefore less exploitation
     increased regional trade: less outflows of hard currency needed for development...

Find Another Essay On Caribbean Integration

ilo in caribbean Essay

1279 words - 5 pages Publications The ILO initiates and contributes to policy-oriented research on subjects relating to world of work in the changing global economy and in the context for deepening regional integration. The ILO Decent Work Team and Office for the Caribbean publishes a variety of publications that focus specifically on social and labour issues in the countries in the English- and Dutch-speaking Caribbean. Statistics and databases Within the UN system

The Caribbean Current Political System Essay

1007 words - 5 pages continue to be exposed to these Agencies that claim to assist financially and otherwise. In the absence of these pillars that bear us up and upon which we depend so much, what then happens to the Caribbean? Despite several years of establishing various organs (CSME, CRNM, CARIFORUM etc) in an effort to promote integration, the Caribbean has failed to achieve true integration. The point remains that these institutions, neither on their own nor

Caribbean Culture and the Way it Formed

1190 words - 5 pages slavery, colonialism and the integration of cultures that span from Africa to India. Exploration by the authors is taken from two different views, one by Mintz and Rojo where they are looking on the culture from outside and the other by Cliff who depicts the situation from inside. Sidney Mintz is social scientist that attempts to classify the Caribbean into its own typology in order to describe its socio-cultural structure, Antonio Benitz-Rojo is

Globalisation and the Media

802 words - 3 pages Forerunner Magazine, 'is the belief that worldwide integration of cultures is both possible and desirable. "). Globalisation was also described by Professor Trevor Munroe, as "a process in which geographic, economic, and cultural boundaries of the world are decreasing significance, first and foremost to the movement of capital".The convergence of the mass media has some far reaching implications for local non western cultures. However, one of the most

education

9004 words - 36 pages organizations that attempt to facilitate globalisation. - Assess the ways in which Globalisation affects development in the region - Describe the evolution of the integration movement in the Caribbean - Explain the ways in which the integration movement has affected development in the region Defining Globalization • Globalization : the process whereby 'flows of trade, finance and information between countries are broadened and deepened so that they

education

9004 words - 36 pages organizations that attempt to facilitate globalisation. - Assess the ways in which Globalisation affects development in the region - Describe the evolution of the integration movement in the Caribbean - Explain the ways in which the integration movement has affected development in the region Defining Globalization • Globalization : the process whereby 'flows of trade, finance and information between countries are broadened and deepened so that they

The Effect of Slavery on the Identity of Cuba

2116 words - 8 pages individual’s island history and how it dealt with slavery, the integration of cultures, acculturation, and colonialism. The importation of about four million African slaves to the Caribbean was mainly what made these islands the "melting pot" that it is today. Today, Cuba is one of the most racially mixed islands in the Caribbean. Could the racial mixture possibly be the result of the impact of slavery in Cuba during the period of the colony’ s

Lasana M Sekou's Brotherhood of the Spurs

1713 words - 7 pages In “Brotherhood of the Spurs” Lasana M Sekou explores the lives and impact of our African ancestors had in the Caribbean through memory and narratives. The book is divided into four short stories with the main character in each story being spoken of in the third person with periods of dialoguing by the main character. In each of the stories Sekou explores the integration of Caribbean natives as they travel throughout the Caribbean and new world

Fusion of Cultures in the Music of Louis-Moreau Gottschalk

2345 words - 9 pages blend of exotic cultures was key to perpetual fame during his time. By examining the compositions Bamboula (Op. 2) and Souvenir de Porto Rico (Op. 31), I will demonstrate how Gottschalk’s musical style represents an integration of Creole, New Orleans, West Indian, and Afro-Caribbean backgrounds he was exposed to throughout his life. Gottschalk was a child prodigy, showing astonishing musical abilities at a young age. His father, against his

Significance Of Race In Education

3267 words - 13 pages specifies rules for the identification of a given group with cultural differences. This in turn does not distinguish from the fact that all people are the same beneath the skin. This term race can also imply that immigrants will assimilate the culture of their host community. Roy Jenkins Labour Home Secretary in the 60s saw integration not as a flattering process of assimilation but as cultural diversity "in an atmosphere of mutual tolerance". The term

'Regionalism is growing in importance.' Examine the evidence for this statement and analyse the impact for business

2453 words - 10 pages several reasons why regionalism becomes more and more important. Firstly, I will discuss the meaning of regionalism and the development of regional blocs in the play field. Secondly, I will mention the reasons for the collapse of WTO and the growing of regional agreements. Finally, I will present an argument of how regional economic integration in part response to globalisation and the causes of deep integration arrangement. On the other hand, I

Similar Essays

Regional Integration In The Caribbean Essay

1353 words - 5 pages previously unavailable or too expensive to purchase. Regional Integration gives businesses the means to increase revenue significantly by expanding globally. The Caribbean countries formed a regional integration between themselves in 1973 called the Caribbean Community and Common Market (CARICOM). Member countries that make up CARICOM are: Antigua and Barbuda, Belize, Grenada, Montserrat, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Turks and Caicos Islands

The Caribbean Islands Essay

1205 words - 5 pages , Antonio Benitez-Rojo, and Michelle Cliff, all and address the problem of the Caribbean’s identity. They each discuss how the Caribbean’s diverse culture was created and molded by each individual island’s history, how its society was molded by the development of plantations, how the Caribbean dealt with the issue of slavery, and how miscegenation and the integration of cultures, as a result of slavery, contributed to the region’s individualism in

Are We Doing Enough For The Caribbean?

964 words - 4 pages The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS) sprang forth with some of its many purposes of subsistence being: to facilitate the fostering of beneficial associations among member states and in doing so, assist in achieving economic growth and development, as well as promoting economic and political integration among member states thereby vastly extending the region’s sphere of influence. Nevertheless, a circumspect examination of the OECS

Are We Doing Enough For The Caribbean?

1068 words - 4 pages The Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States (OECS), sprang forth with some of its many purposes of subsistence being: to facilitate the fostering of beneficial associations among member states and in doing so, assist in achieving economic growth and development, as well as promoting economic and political integration among member states thereby vastly extending the region’s sphere of influence. Nevertheless, a circumspect examination of the