Character Analysis Of Jay Gatsby Of The Great Gatsby

669 words - 3 pages

A reader’s mind grasps the lives of characters who live in a way the reader can only imagine. In The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Jay Gatsby hosts the most magnificent parties, with the most luxurious decorations and people flooding from almost everywhere. This said, Gatsby hardly shows his face, waiting for one thing that will complete the life that commoners could only dream of. Jay Gatsby lives in an era of self-indulgence, where even he will surrender his own life to reach his goal.
Like many others during this time, Gatsby finds satisfaction in his materialistic possessions. While showing Daisy around his extravagant home, Gatsby explains he receives selections of clothes from England for each of the seasons and, “he took out a pile of shirts and began throwing them, one by one, before us, shirts of sheer linen and thick silk and fine flannel…” (92). Jay Gatsby shows us, in this scene, how much these material ...view middle of the document...

..nothing except a single green light, minute and far way, that might have been the end of a dock” (21). Jay Gatsby watches this light, knowing how close he stands to Daisy, the girl he adores. Not only does Gatsby admire Daisy, he has an overwhelming obsession over her, and yearns for her to love him back. After Daisy attends one of Gatsby’s parties, Nick talks to Gatsby, who is not able to grasp why Daisy doesn’t understand that, “he wanted nothing less of Daisy than that she should go to Tom and say: ‘I never loved you’” (109). Gatsby reminisces over the memories with Daisy from years ago, craving the same attention he once had. Jay Gatsby’s obsessive trait is displayed by his infatuation over Daisy.
Although Gatsby’s love for Daisy is true, he misleads Nick in more ways than one. Jay Gatsby did not inherit his money like he claims; in fact, Gatsby’s story compares to others so much, it is almost unbelieveable. After Gatsby tells Nick a little about his past, Nick finds the story false, “and with this doubt, his whole statement fell to pieces, and I wondered if there wasn’t something a little sinister about him, after all” (65). Later, contrary to almost everything Gatsby mentions before, his father, Mr. Gatz, reveals the truth to Nick. This said, after Mr. Gatz enters the home with surprise, “...he looked around him now for the first time and saw the height and splendor of the halls…” (168), noticing the splendor and elegance of a mansion he could never afford, displaying that what Gatsby had told Nick about his wealth coming from deceased relatives was false. Gatsby fools Nick into believing his life was always excellent, when the contrary was true.
Jay Gatsby falls victim to the Jazz Age in which he lives in, where alcohol is forbidden, women’s dresses are scandalous, and money is everything. From people to clothes, his unique life has him surrounded by nothing but the finest; the incomparable luxuries are what Gatsby lives for, even if he hasn’t had them his whole life. Jay Gatsby’s life captivates the reader, allowing them to dream of a life more considerable than their own.
Works Cited

Fitzgerald, Scott. The Great Gatsby. New York: Scribner, 2004.

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