Contemporary Widening Of The European Union

3506 words - 14 pages

Following the post-World War II carnage and violence, a new Europe arose from the ashes. This new Europe was decimated from the intermittent fighting between the Allied and Axis powers during the second great war and the nations of Europe sought to devise a plan that to avoid further war-time conflicts within the region. The European Coal and Steel Committee was the first advent of assembling nations together in political and economic interest. The ECSC was formed in 1950 with the signing of the Treaty of Paris whose signatories included West Germany , Italy, Luxembourg, Belgium, France and The Netherlands.

These “Inner Six” nations thus laid the framework for further integration of other nations within the region and its supranational principles were what led to the creation of the European Economic Community in 1957, further assimilating the European countries’ economies. The creations of these communities for economic purposes were meant to promote cooperation amongst European nations to prevent the further outbreak of violence which had subsided with the end of WWII. Through these general agreements of economic importance came further integration through the creation of more agreements throughout the 1960s, such as the abolishment of customs duties amongst their borders, creating free trade and border trade tax pacts among the Inner Six and across their borders to other signatory nations.
The first period of enlargement occurred following the adoption of several agreements and norms amongst the nations of Denmark, Ireland, and the United Kingdom in January of 1973 followed by Greece in January of 1981. The Inner Six nations had proliferated their agreements amongst each other to 4 other nations, bringing the total number of European nations under agreement to double figures. With the addition of Spain and Portugal in 1986, the European Community now encompasses all of Western Europe for the first time. The single European Act of 1986 is also passed at this time, further integrating trade relations amongst all of the signatory nations and allowing for the free movement of goods and services. During this period of integration, the former USSR starts to lose control of some its territories in Europe, such as Hungary and Poland, culminating in Western Germany opening its gates for the mass exodus of Eastern Germans from their territory. With the fall of the Berlin Wall, East and West Germany are reunited once again. This will pivotal for further widening in the future.

The Treaty of the European Union is signed in February of 1992 in Maastricht, Netherlands. Under this treaty, guidelines for further integration of European policy for a single currency, foreign policy, security policy, as well as justice and home affairs are established. The Four Pillars are also created during the early 1990’s which include the free movement of people, goods, services, and money. New members introduced during this decade include Austria, Finland, and Sweden...

Find Another Essay On Contemporary Widening of the European Union

The History of the European Monetary Union

3624 words - 14 pages )1. The development of the European Monetary UnionIn 1998 the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM) was introduced as part of the EMS in order to reduce exchange rate variability and to achieve monetary stability in Europe in preparation for the European Monetary Union and for the introduction of the Euro. In 1999 ERM II replaced ERM. ERM II is an exchange rate mechanism for EU countries which are currently not taking part in the monetary union

The Tremendous Benefits of the European Union

1687 words - 7 pages of the European Union and its organizations. Since different theories of international relations view political events in vastly different ways, the standard schools of thought (realist, liberalist, and feminist) regarding these international organizations will be specifically examined regarding their opinion on EU developments. The European Union, in uniting the nations of Europe under a regional system of sovereign states, attempts to unify

The Enlargement of the European Union

2433 words - 10 pages The enlargement of the European Union (EU) in 2004 and 2007 has been termed as the largest single expansion of the EU with a total of 12 new member states – bringing the number of members to 27 – and more than 77 million citizens joining the Commission (Murphy 2006, Neueder 2003, Ross 2011). A majority of the new member states in this enlargement are from the eastern part of the continent and were countries that had just emerged from communist

The Impact of European Monetary Union

2107 words - 8 pages I. Introduction According to Lane (2006), the European Monetary Union (EMU) began on the year 1999. Following his line of analysis and reasoning, this paper shall seek to analyze the purported impacts of the said action in the light of their inflation rates and the proportion of their portfolio holdings allocated to the other members of the Euro-zone. Furthermore, the author of this paper shall look qualitatively in the current Asian context to

Environmental Policy of the European Union

3083 words - 12 pages The EU on the environmental path Introduction The European Union (EU) is a local political and economic union between 28 member-states. However, apart from its domestic political significance it is also considered as an important international actor, which participates in the ongoing debates concerned with number of issues. These issues go beyond traditional security and economic threats along with questions posed to the members of such

The European Union

1022 words - 5 pages Making Institutional reform in any unions will always be controversial between members and those who are in the steering seat. As well as for the consequences that faces them after implementing new changes. The aim of this paper is to discuss my opinion on what institutional reform I find being essential to improve the European Union as whole. The first institutional reform I would want to start with is to make the European Parliament a

The European Union

4598 words - 18 pages Introduction In the course of fifty years, the European Union has expanded from six countries united under economic treaties to a large collective of twenty-five sovereign nations. Maintaining the union within such a large group has grown more difficult as numerous treaties have been drafted to control the governance of the European Union. To reduce the number of treaties in the union, the convention decided to draft a Constitution, which

The European Union extended

4864 words - 19 pages 1. Why the European Union?PeaceThe idea of a united Europe was once just a dream in the minds of philosophers and visionaries. Victor Hugo, for example, imagined a peaceful 'United States of Europe' inspired by humanistic ideals. The dream was shattered by two terrible wars that ravaged the continent during the first half of the 20th century.But from the rubble of World War II emerged a new kind of hope. People who had resisted totalitarianism

The European Union

5786 words - 23 pages The European Union 1.     INTRODUCTION     1 1.1.     MISSIONS AND VISIONS FOR THE EUROPEAN UNION     1 1.2.     THE GENERAL VIEW OF THE EUROPEAN UNION     1 1.3.     THE LEVEL OF INVOLVEMENT FOR EUROPEAN UNION     2 2.   &nbsp

The European Union

935 words - 4 pages       The European Union is a supranational government body that is, by definition, changing the traditional role of the nation state and sovereignty in Europe. This Union was formed voluntarily by states with similar goals and is unique in its conception and design to the European continent. Although The EU (European Union) is strengthening Europe economically and politically the states that form it have surrendered

The European Union

721 words - 3 pages The European Union (EU) was created in the outcome of the Second World War. The enlargement of the EU was ver big, it went from six countries to 28 countries. With this enlargement, it has economically and politically really changed some countries. Since the EU is based in Europe, it has really helped countries economically. So the enlargement of the EU is very effective in a positive manner. The EU was officially created on November 1, 1993

Similar Essays

Contemporary Benefits Of The European Union

1439 words - 6 pages encouraged the idea of European countries banding together, he likened it to ‘a kind of United States of Europe’. However, this view has not always brought enthusiasm, with some fearing the idea of a ‘super state’, loss of sovereignty, spending money/sharing resources where they will not see a return or perhaps due to a lack of faith in the importance of being part of the European Union (EU), hence some countries have still not joined (for example

Britain’s Support For Widening But Not Deepening The European Union

2172 words - 9 pages Over the last 30 years Britain has consistently supported the enlargement of the European Union (EU). Both the former Conservative, and the current Labour governments have always presented favourable rhetoric for the ‘widening’ of the EU. This apparent consensus on European policy belies the fractious nature of opinions in Britain over the future of Europe. The rough undercurrents of Britain’s contingent support for the intergovernmental vision

Enlargement Of The European Union Essay

2723 words - 11 pages The intention of this paper is to identify the advantages and disadvantages for both Central and Eastern European countries (CEECs) and the European Union, when the CEECs eventually join the EU. This will be done by first introducing the subject through a brief background concerning past enlargements of the Union, and will continue by outlining the countries that have been accepted as candidates. Moving on, the various criteria for accession

The Success Of The European Union

1715 words - 7 pages The European Union can be traced back to the 1940’s when British wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill envisaged a United States of Europe. However, Churchill had no idea how powerful an institution it would become by the late 20th century. The formation of the EU came just over a decade after the Second World War, 1957. For the EU’s originators the EU was a way of reducing national hostility, resentment and competition, which had driven the