Cry Teh Beloved Country Comparison Between Stephen Kumalo And James Jarvis

880 words - 4 pages

People in this world are very similar to each other but they also have their differences. Many people are of the same ethnicity or culture; they practice the same religion, and even have the same pastimes and enjoy the same activities. Although we are all alike in many ways, no matter how alike you are there will always be differences. In the book Cry the Beloved Country, by Alan Paton, Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis are two different people and although they live in the same village they come from two extremely different worlds, and end up meeting in the middle. Stephen Kumalo and James Jarvis are two different people. Kumalo is a poor black preacher from the valley of the South African village of Ndotsheni. While looking for his sister in Johannesburg, Kumalo discovered that his son, Absalom had killed a man, that man was Jarvis' son, Arthur. Later on in the book James Jarvis looses his wife to an illness. Kumalo is a very trusting man, very concerned about the welfare of his family. He is not quick to receive a handout. Kumalo is a very trusting man, very concerned about the welfare of his family. He is not quick to receive a handout. Kumalo trusts the Lord with everything he does, he is a loving and God- fearing man, "Although his money was little he brought her a red dress and a white thing that they called a turban for her head. Also a shirt, a pair of short trousers, and a jersey for the boy and a couple of stout handkerchiefs for his mother to use on his nose" (64). Kumalo is very gullible and is quick to trust, he is also not very smart with the people he relies on, "The man looked a decent man, and the parson spoke to him humbly, I gave a pound to a young man, he said, and he told me he would get my ticket at the ticket office. You have been cheated, umfundisi. Can you see the young man? No, you will not see him again" (49). On the other hand, James Jarvis is a racist who has never really been exposed to the natives of South Africa, White people, black people, coloured people, Indians, it was the first time that Jarvis and his wife had sat in a church with people who were not white" (181).In light of their differences, Kumalo and Jarvis also have similarities. Over the course of the book Kumalo and Jarvis both lose loved ones. Kumalo's son is killed because he...

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