Fairy Tale Appropriation Politically Correct Reading. Puss In Boots

1102 words - 4 pages

The Cat's BootsOnce upon a time, in a monarchical land, there lived a miller and his three sons. When the miller passed away, his assets (a mill, a donkey and a cat) were divided between his sons by a system of chance. It just so happened that the youngest son received the short straw, meaning that he only inherited a cat. This caused him some distress.As he was pondering miserably, he said aloud to himself, "What shall I do? My brothers are fortunate, they can work together to earn their income but what can I do with a cat? If I eat him, I will soon grow hungry again and will surely die of starvation."Upon hearing this, the cat stood on his hind legs and said, "Just because I am a cat, it does not mean that I have no value other than being your dinner. I have some skills and if you give me a chance, I will help you succeed. All you have to do is provide me with a sack and a pair of boots.""Absolutely. I will grant your request, though it is strange, and I apologise for any discriminatory pain you have suffered. You must understand that I was desperate and in despair, so I was not being rational.A few days later, the cat ventured into the forest, wearing his new boots. Using his sack, he caught a rabbit and killed it mercilessly, as it was in his predatory nature. Instead of giving the rabbit to his master (there would be many opportunities for that later) he strutted up to the king's castle and offered it as a gift from his master; the Marquis of Carabas. This was the name that he invented for the miller's son to give him a seemingly noble status. For a few months, he continued to present the King with gifts from the Marquis of Carabas.One day, as the cat was leaving the castle, he overheard a conversation between two servants about the king's plans to ride by the river later that day with his daughter. Seizing the perfect opportunity, he rushed home to his master and told him to bathe in the river. The miller's son thought it strange, but trusting his cat he wisely obeyed.As his master was bathing, the cat hid his clothes behind a bush. When he heard the sound of the King's carriage, he stood in the middle of the road and cried out, "Help! Help! The Marquis of Carabas is drowning. Save him!"The King heard the commotion and ordered his servants to stop the carriage immediately and rescue the drowning man. The King was a caring man and if someone was in need, be them lord, peasant or creature, then the King was prepared to help. However, the cat believed that the King was motivated by the fact that a nobleman was drowning and thought himself clever.After the Marquis was pulled out of the river, the King gave him a fine suit to wear, which made him look more of a gentleman. The princess saw how handsome he was and immediately grew interested. However, she did not fall in love instantaneously, for love is not based on someone's appearance but on their personality and character, but wanted to become more acquainted with him and then let...

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