How The Use Of The Diary Form Narrative Is Beneficial To The Novel "Dracula" By Bram Stoker.

886 words - 4 pages

How the use of the diary form narrative is beneficial to the novel Dracula.Bram Stoker, being the creative and intellectual writer himself, wrote the novelDracula in the diary form of narrative. This was a good choice of how to write the novelsince it was very beneficial to the plot of Dracula. Examples of how the diary form isbeneficial to Dracula is seen in his writing and book.One of the greatest benefits of the diary narrative is that the reader is allowedsee, and feel the emotional hearts and souls of the emotional characters. This is greatbecause when a character is not feeling too great and is trying hide something, the readerknows this, and therefore the reader knows everything that is happening; nothing is beinghidden from the reader. An example of this happening is when Mina is at the insane asylumand is worried sick about something happening to Jonathan Harker. Mina hides all that shefeels when Jonathan Harker is near her. All that Mina is feeling is written by herself, andwhat, how she is feeling is ready for a reader to examine because they are able to see herdiary. If Mina's diary was not open to the reader, or if Someone was telling of what he orshe saw, the observation could be false and the reader would lose valuable information thatwould be valuable to the whole plot of the book.Some things that can be noticed about the diary form is that different views of thesame thing can be expressed by many different people; all in first person view. Then, alongwith that, there are extensive and very detailed descriptions about a thing, or person thatis being described. In the novel, this is seen as Jonathan Harker is traveling and hedescribes almost everything, he does, eat, sees, etc.Another use of the diary form is that Bram Stoker can have people 'talk tothemselves.' So if the person who is writing in his or her diary, that person can makenotes to him/herself writing 'I must ask the Count about this.' So by 'talking to him/herown self' in this manner, he is writing it down and they do not in any way make it so thatthey seem strange in front of public.The good thing about using the diary to write is that it can be used interchangeablywith periodicals and letters being written or read by a person. In the same way as in adiary, extensive descriptions and large emotional feelings can be expressed and felt by thereader. Also, during the usage of letters, two people conversing will and can be writtenout in dialog form; because of this, the two people, while talking, will not have to...

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