Human Rights: Mothers Of Argentina Essay

1079 words - 4 pages

The disappearance of thousands of people should not go unnoticed. This is what so many mothers, grandmothers, and family members of Argentina have been fighting about everyday because a radical government took their family members from them. The mothers of the missing citizens, or the Mothers of Plaza De Mayo is an incredible organization fighting for human rights after the people closest to them were taken. The disappearances happened for a reason according to some like Bruce Allen, a writer for the online organization Labournet. But there still is no answer to the question, where are all of the people that went missing from 1974 to 1983? According to Allen, "the deaths can be traced to a United States backed effort to crush the Argentine Left." (Allen p.1) The disappearances started between 1974 and 1975 with about 600 missing person's reports. By 1976 the number of missing grew incredibly and happens to be the same year that the new Military Government was formed and took power. Around 1976 the mothers of the first missing persons had already formed a group to fight for their right to know where their loved ones were. The efforts of the mothers did not help, meeting at Police Stations and on the streets. Every big institution in Argentina, from the Police to the church had been interviewed but people still wound up missing. The children of the mothers were kidnapped until 1983 and most of them were murdered with some 9,000 unaccounted for in the "dirty war." (p.1 Allen) All of these women were in the same situation. Their children had been taken and killed by a radical government that had no right to take the lives of innocent people. The women in Argentina were in this situation together and were not alone. All over the globe, especially Latin and South America, the governments and other dictatorship type groups were violating human rights. In Chile, women were chaining themselves to railings of the national legislature and in El Salvador mothers protested through sit-ins in the National Cathedral. Other countries such as Brazil and Sri Lanka formed protest and support groups for the mothers of the country who had their loved ones taken. In Sri Lanka, mothers gathered at national conventions and rallies. (Andrea Malin p.2) About three years after the first disappearances in 1977 the mothers of Argentina formed the group The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo. The mothers had a goal to keep the memory of their lost loved ones alive, so people would never forget the tragedy that has occurred in their lives. "The mothers first ventured into the Plaza de Mayo in April of 1977. In the beginning they were a group of fourteen but by 1982 the group had spread out to over 2,500." (Andrea Malin p.2) The mothers would wear white kerchiefs and marched around the Plaza de Mayo with pictures of their missing loved ones. The mothers have met every Thursday at 3:30p.m. since 1977 and still practice this today. (Andrea Malin p.2) According to the...

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