Imaginative Language In Alice In The Wonderland By Lewis Carroll´S Literature

636 words - 3 pages

In many children’s poems, writers attempt to connect with the younger ones through language that they understand. Many people, such as Dr. Seuss, make up their own silly and inventive language that not only teaches children that they can write, too, but it also makes them laugh at the hilarious adjectives and nouns. However, Dr. Seuss isn’t the only author who uses quirky words to capture readers’ attention. Another writer, by the name of Lewis Carroll, uses imaginative language in his two novels, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, In one of these texts, there is a poem, where he uses this same technique in a very clever and creative way. The messages that the poem portrays due to the language is more than just comedy for children. Looking deeper into the poem, Jabberwocky, by Lewis Carroll, the creative language suggests that using your own words makes your work more interesting, ...view middle of the document...

Brillig means four o'clock in the afternoon, toves are creatures resembling badgers, lizards, and corkscrews. Gyre is to spin round and around, gimble is to make holes, and wabe is a grass plot around a sundial.
Secondly, in the last fifty years, commonly-spoken words in America have changed dramatically, and these portmanteaus could very well be the next common words that Americans speak. When you are communicating with a friend, slang is used quite often. Although these words are not actually legitimately defined in a dictionary, we understand and comprehend them as actual phrases and words. Filler words are used often; these include the words, “uh, like,” and “ya know.” Not so long ago, words like “dude” would have been alien, yet they are common nowadays. In a matter of another fifty year period, “whiffling through the tulgey wood (Line 15)” could very well become the next common phrase.
Lastly, cursing and swearing have been altered dramatically over the last century, and the bad language, as well as the good, will change. “Fiddlesticks” is now !@#$. Although it means the same as it did back then, Fiddlesticks isn’t censored. In the South, you could be so mad, you could spit. That is severe cursing down in Mississippi, yet not so much in Wyoming. Just as the swearing words have changed in the past, they can (and most likely will) change again. For example, “Son of a !@#$%” may turn into, “The mome raths outgrabe! (Line 4)” Lewis Carroll, and more specifically, Jabberwocky, shows us this.
Thorough culture changes, both good and bad, we are influenced by writings. Hitler’s speeches created protests, and the death of six million people. Readers also see themselves and their life choices in poetry. Obviously, by looking deeper into the poem, Jabberwocky, by Lewis Carroll, the creative language suggests that using your own words makes your work more interesting, cultural language in America is constantly changing, and that using this type of blanket shows the maturity and background, and offensive words change as well as comic ones.

Find Another Essay On Imaginative Language in Alice in the Wonderland by Lewis Carroll´s Literature

Lewis Carroll's Alice In Wonderland Essay

1371 words - 5 pages Lewis Carroll’s fascinating novel Alice in Wonderland, published in 1865, was foremost intended to entertain and pleasure children with a new outlook on the ability to imagine and explore one’s creative mind. Alice is not only just a character in a book, but a dear friend to Mr. Carroll. She inspired and encouraged Carroll to first tell the original story and further publish the tale into the enduring classic, Alice in Wonderland. In the novel

Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland Essay

609 words - 2 pages eat eggsquite as much as serpents do, you know.'Ethel Rowell, to whom Dodgson taught logic when she was young, wrote that shewas grateful that he had encouraged her to 'that arduous business ofthinking.' While Lewis Carroll's Alice books compel us to laugh and towonder, we are also easily led, almost in spite of ourselves, to think aswell.FURTHER READING:Lewis Carroll. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass,with an

Use of Food in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll

3867 words - 15 pages habits and lessen her feeling of guilt by saying: “I shouldn’t want yours: I don’t like them raw” (qtd. in Carroll: 48). The differentiation between raw and cooked food is associated with primitive and civilized behaviour. By rejecting to eat raw eggs, Alice as well tries to reject the primitive nature of a predator the Pigeon tries to accuse her of (Daniel 22). The Wonderland-creatures’ capacity for language complicates the consumption of food

Lewis Carroll's Alice Adventures in Wonderland

2484 words - 10 pages Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland is a masterpiece of nonsensical language and is enjoyed widely by children and adults alike. The story appeals to children on a mainly silly, fictional level, but when analyzed with a more mature mind, it is intriguing in its symbolic artistry. Carroll’s way of writing about this fictional Wonderland is truly exquisite because he has mastered the style of absurdity. When Alice falls down the

Lewis Carroll's Alice Adventures in Wonderland

1657 words - 7 pages . 2004. PDF. Carroll, Lewis, and Helen Oxenbury. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Cambridge, MA: Candlewick, 1999. Print. Keenlyside, Perry. "CARROLL, L.: Alice' S Adventures in Wonderland (Abridged)." CARROLL, L.: Alice' S Adventures in Wonderland. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2014. "Poem Origins: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." Poem Origins: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. N.p., n.d. Web. 12 May 2014.

Comparing Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll and Don Quixote, by Miguel de Cervantes

1974 words - 8 pages and Lewis Carroll in their texts, Don Quixote and Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. While the texts follow two contrasting characters, they are brought together by the theme of fantasy. Cervantes’ Don Quixote is an old gentleman of noble lineage who becomes tired of the monotony and the lack of meaning in his life. Through his maddening and compulsive taste in books of chivalry, he concludes that the ideal life is that which is undertaken by a

The Wizard of Oz by Frank, Alice in Wonder Land by Lewis Carroll, The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien This essay was written in comparison as requested by my instructor

1097 words - 4 pages "The Wizard of Oz"By L. Frank Baum"Alice in Wonder Land"By Lewis Carroll"The Hobbit"By J.R.R. TolkienThe Wizard of Oz, Alice in Wonder Land and The Hobbit are great fantasies. All three stories have something in common. The Wizard of Oz and Alice in Wonder Land are about a little girl and imagination. Baum did a great job of taking every day reality and things and making them into fantasy. The novel also contained a great deal of suspense. In

Biography and Critical Analysis of Lewis Carrol and his work "Alice in Wonderland"

1554 words - 6 pages orders and became a mathematics professor at Oxford until influenza caused death. Alice in Wonder is the work Dodgson, recognized by his pseudonym Lewis Carroll in this story, is most famous for. He created the story for the one of the three daughters of Henry Liddell, dean of Chirst Church who introduced Dodgson to photography. This work is a perfect example to show the witty and humorous yet intellectual and puzzling style of Dodgson's fictional

This essay dives into the philosophy behind Lewis Caroll's Alice in WOnderland. It breaks down the story into three major philosophical ideas

2244 words - 9 pages Alice's Adventures in Wonderland("but that's what it's called, you know!")The best way to describe Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, would be a fictitious fantasy about the real world. Although "Wonderland" is a reality deprived dreamland, the ideas of realism and life seem to be more obvious there than on the planet earth. Wonderland is found somewhere between logic and the imagination. Lewis Carroll successfully takes the

World Literature Paper. “Solzhenitsyn´s Use of Selected Language in One day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich

1253 words - 6 pages World Literature Paper “Solzhenitsyn use of selected language in justifying the main essence of the story” Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, a Russian writer of the emotional piece One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich uses Russian traditional oral style skaz ( from Russian ‘skazat’ - to say or tell) and it explains the author’s general skaz approach in One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich - Solzhenitsyn uses skaz to emphasize the experience of the

Alice In Wonderland

797 words - 3 pages In Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures In Wonderland, daydreams make a significant impact on Alice's life. As Alice daydreams, she is in fact learning important lessons that help her change and grow--actually mature. The theme that every experience, whether real or imagined, contributes to one's maturity is brought out through characterization and symbolism in the novel.Lewis Carroll, otherwise known as C. L. Dodgson was born in 1832. Carroll was

Similar Essays

Alice In Wonderland Lewis Carroll A Bookreport

665 words - 3 pages to be resourceful. She has a cat named Diana. She falls through a rabbit hole to wonderland. She is actually the only main character, mainly because all the other characters appear briefly. And there are plenty of those: The Cheshire cat, the duchess, the queen, the white rabbit and others. The story begins on a bank of a river, where Alice sits near her sister and her cat, Dian. Suddenly she sees a white rabbit dressed in a coat. Alice

Lewis Carroll And Alice's Adventures In Wonderland, By Lewis Carroll

1929 words - 8 pages Nursery “Alice,” was written in 1889. Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There was published in 1872 and this book was a sequel to Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (1865) (Wakeling). One of Lewis Carroll’s most memorable friends was, of course, Alice Liddell, for whom he made up the Alice books and to whom they were dedicated. The “fairy-tale of Alice’s adventures underground” was first told by Carroll on July fourth, in 1862, when he and

Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland, By Lewis Carroll

1243 words - 5 pages trains of thought. After becoming rather overwhelmed from all of the advice being given to her, Alice is awakened from this bizarre dream by her older sister, telling her that it is time to go home. All through Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, using parody, satire, and symbolism, Lewis Carroll pointedly compares Alice’s dream-world to his own existing world of the 1800s. Parodied events in Wonderland, such as the trial of the Knave of

Victorian Era And Alice's Adventures In Wonderland By Lewis Carroll

2778 words - 11 pages Victorian Era and Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll Known for its utilitarianist ideals, the education system of the Victorian Era limited the thoughts, speech, and actions of the individual; People were the product of the Victorian society in which they were raised. Many Victorian novelists highlight this mechanization of human beings, as it contributed to the identity crisis epidemic of the Victorian Era in which children