Looking For The Horizon With Tea Cake In "Their Eyes Were Watching God" By Zora Neale Hurston

984 words - 4 pages

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston centers around the life of Janie Crawford, an African American young woman, who is seeking ‘the horizon’ comprised of ideal living, experiences, and authentic love. After having two failed marriages, Janie meets Tea Cake, a suave, charming younger man who truly loves Janie. By exposing Janie to the world, and providing her with experiences and memories, Tea Cake directs her to the ‘horizon,’ where she can lead a fulfilling life. The selected passage begins as Janie concludes sharing her story with Phoeby. The flashback comes to its end, and the setting returns to Eatonville, Florida. I selected this passage because it reveals the great impact that Tea Cake has had on shaping Janie’s life.

Reflecting on her journey, Janie is genuinely fulfilled. With help from Tea Cake, she has experienced the life.
Janie gets a chance to live according to her principles. She is not confined to Nanny’s materialistic view of love. Nor bent to assumptions of the society. She goes ‘tuh de horizon and back.’ The symbol of horizon serves as an idealistic way of living and true love for Janie. Tea Cake guides her to the ‘horizon’- to life and genuine love. He shares the world with her. His world is composed of feelings, music, fishing, gambling, good and bad experiences, and love.
It is of significance to note Hurston’s choice of the word ‘strong’ in describing Janie’s feet. ‘Strong feet’ evokes the image of masculinity and contrasts with Janie’s attractiveness and femininity. Janie presumably developed ‘strong feet,’ due to the labor she was exposed to, for the first time in Everglades. However, instead of conveying the message of masculinity, ‘strong feet’ offers Janie with memories, experiences shared with her love, Tea Cake.
Tea Cake provides Janie with ‘comparison’ between leading a life solely concentrated on material needs and a life devoted to exploring the world and experiencing life.
Janie notes that the house ‘ain’t so absent of things lak it used tuh be befo’ Tea Cake come along.’ The word ‘things’ has a double connotation to it. It may suggest materialistic belongings acquired by Janie’s marriage to Joe Starks. ‘Things’ also implies memories, experiences, and real love that Tea Cake shares with Janie. Ironically, the house is full of lavish things. However, Janie is clearly not satisfied with material ‘things’ and considers them to possess no significance, since it can be inferred from the passage that the house was empty of ‘things’ prior to Tea Cake’s arrival. Tea Cake introduces the meaning of life to Janie, and grants her with experience that will withstand the superior definition of ‘things’ and will live forever in her memories.
‘The room’ serves as another factor of comparison. The bedroom symbolizes types of loves, Janie has experienced through her marriages. Janie and Tea Cake’s marriage presents a physical and a more equal aspect of love, unforeseen by Janie’s first two...

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