Minister's Black Veil Essay

893 words - 4 pages

The Minister?s Black Veil-Character I chose to write on Hawthorne?s, The Minister?s Black Veil. I considered the character?s in the story intriguing, from the mystery they portrayed. The characters in this story, and any story, consist of a protagonist and an antagonist. Some label the protagonist as the good guy, or ?white hat,? and the antagonist the bad guy, or ?black hat.? The protagonist in this story was Mr. Hooper. He was the town reverend, and everyone listened to his word on every Sabbath day. The people of the town were frightened and astonished by the black veil he wore, but he was still the same person underneath the veil. He was not intending to harm anyone. So, I felt I could label him the protagonist of the story. I also believed that veil itself was a form of a protagonist. The veil was placed there, not to scare the people, but to block the evil in the world that Mr. Hooper was infected with, or hiding from. The town?s people considered the veil evil instantly. They did not even attempt to ask the reverend why he wore the veil, so they were never informed on the true meaning. Instead of asking why he wore it, they wondered and made assumptions.There was no single antagonist in this story. The whole community, from his fiancee, Elizibeth, to the sexton, down to Reverend Mr. Clark, who wished Mr. Hooper his final blessings before his passing. The whole town deemed Mr. Hooper as this man of evil and dark mystery. They turned Mr. Hooper away, and looked at him as a freak show, not as the melancholy Reverend he once was. The way Hooper was shut out from his community was part of the demise of the Reverend. When he walked out of his church, he saw children playing, and like always he gave kind notice to the children. Instead of acknowledging the Reverend, the children ran in fear. That tore at Mr. Hooper. He was also hurt by the leaving of his love, Elizabeth, who wouldn?t stay with him through such desperate times. If the community had tried to understand why the man decided to wear a piece of crape over his face, instead of tearing him apart, his life would have been worth going on. Before the town showed fear of the veil, he was comfortable with the veil, and I believe his life could have gone on to the fullest.This short story has come to the attention of readers, and some have written critical summaries, or essays, about The Minister?s Black Veil. One of these critiques is by a man named, William Freedman. Freedman wrote, The Artist?s Symbol and...

Find Another Essay On Minister's Black Veil

The Minister's Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne

1641 words - 7 pages The Minister's Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne "The Minister's black veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a story of a life of a clergyman Hooper which leaves the reader with the feeling of sacrifice but also a sort of a personal tragedy. The reader becomes acquainted with the protagonist at the crucial moment of his life, the moment in which he decides to wear a black veil on his face. The very beginning of the story is

The Essence Of Symbolism In "The Minister's Black Veil"

1324 words - 5 pages The short story, "The Minister's Black Veil" is by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne is known for using strong symbolism in his stories. The symbolism in this story is from a black veil that Reverend Hooper wears to a service one Sunday morning and then continues wearing it for the rest of his life. There are many theories as to why Reverend Hooper wears this veil over his face. This veil changes the life of Reverend Hooper and literally all of the

Hidden sins in "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne

1117 words - 4 pages 'The Minister's Black Veil', a literary masterpiece written by Nathaniel Hawthorne, was a divergent parable for the period it was written. Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote as an anti-transcendentalist in the transcendentalist period; as a result, his view's in writings were mostly pessimistic considering his family's sinfulness. Hawthorne's grandfather was a judge in the Salem witch trails; for that reason, he was responsible for over twenty innocent

Analysis of Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" and "The Birthmark"

875 words - 4 pages immensely. In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" and "The Birthmark," it becomes clear through symbolism and character that the judgment of physical imperfections can restrain or obstruct one from truly obtaining the gifts or treasures that the criticized person could offer.In the "Veil," Mr. Hooper and his black veil are utilized to exemplify the potential barrier that a simple physical characteristic can express. For example

A Comparison of "The Scarlet Letter" and "The Minister's Black Veil"

1014 words - 4 pages Throughout his literary endeavors, Nathaniel Hawthorne utilizes symbolism to present a certain theme that pertains to human nature and life. In his works, The Scarlet Letter and "The Minister's Black Veil", Hawthorne uses symbolism to present a common theme pertaining to religion; that though manifested sin will ostracize a person from society, un-confessed sin will destroy the soul. The central theme in The Scarlet Letter is that

Main Themes of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and The Minister's Black Veil

796 words - 3 pages Main Themes of Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter and The Minister's Black Veil Nathaniel Hawthorne’s works often have parallel themes and similar characters. His approach is quite gloomy and the atmosphere for his stories is many times sad and depressing. Hawthorne concentrates his novel and short stories around the Puritan community, which adds to the tense and unforgiving atmosphere. One of his most renowned novels, The Scarlet

Similar Themes in both Roger Malvin's Burial and The Minister's Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne

3309 words - 14 pages In both “Roger Malvin's Burial” and “The Minister's Black Veil,” Nathaniel Hawthorne centralizes the themes of sin, guilt, and repentance. Both are very much set in terms of what defines sin and, in turn, what would constitute action leaving an opening for forgiveness, and both leave many a question unanswered in the story being told. The main question for us becomes, then, one of applicability. Does either story hold a message, if so, what? In

This essay compares and contrasts the sin in Nathaniel Hawthorne's short stories "The Birthmark," "The Minister's Black Veil," and "Young Goodman Brown."

1035 words - 4 pages sin is somehow masked and concealed from others, and prevents humans from achieving pure goodness (O'Toole). Among Hawthorne's many literary works, "The Birthmark," "The Minister's Black Veil," and "Young Goodman Brown" provide excellent examples in depicting the variances among the common theme of evil and sin.In "Young Goodman Brown," Hawthorne creates a conflict between Brown and his own acceptance of sin in mankind. In the story, Goodman

Damage of Assumptions in Hawthorne's The Minister's Black Veil

573 words - 2 pages The damage that can come from assumptions is far greater than most people today realize. “The Minister’s Black Veil” by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a short story which shows the sad truth of how society makes false assumptions about others. Throughout the story, the townspeople’s assumptions regarding Mr. Hooper causes themselves and Mr. Hooper much distress and sorrow. During the last scene of the story, Mr. Hooper is laying in his death bed with

Minister's Black Veil - Poverty in Minister’s Black Veil and in Hawthorne’s Life

1483 words - 6 pages Poverty in “The Minister’s Black Veil” and in Hawthorne’s Life                 How many readers have considered that the utter simplicity within the Nathaniel Hawthorne short story, “The Minister’s Black Veil,” might be an expression or reflection of the utter poverty within the life of Hawthorne? It is the purpose of this essay to clarify this issue.   Hawthorne’s impoverishment probably began with the untimely death of his

Minister's Black Veil - Poverty in the Tale and in the Life of the Author

1585 words - 6 pages “The Minister’s Black Veil” – Poverty in the Tale and in the Life of the Author              Henry Seidel Canby in “A Skeptic Incompatible with His Time and His Past” mentions of Hawthorne that “human failures and their causes were more interesting to him than prophecies of success, one might truly say than success itself. …He was not, I think, really interested in escape, except in moods of financial discouragement. . . . (57). Nathaniel

Similar Essays

The Minister's Black Veil Essay

1122 words - 4 pages In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil," Mr. Hooper, a Reverend in the town of Milford, surprises his parishioners by donning a conspicuous black veil one Sunday. The town is visibly spooked, yet still curious, about his eerie appearance and profoundly affected by his sermon on secret sin. "A subtle power was breathed into his words. Each member of the congregation, the most innocent girl, and the man of hardened breast, felt as

Alienation In The Minister's Black Veil

678 words - 3 pages Alienation in The Minister's Black Veil "The Minister's Black Veil" by Nathaniel Hawthorne is a story about one clergyman's alienation due to his outward dressing. Reverend Hooper was a well-respected preacher who got along well with the townspeople until one day when he appeared wearing a black veil over his face that consisted "of two folds of crape, which entirely concealed his features, except the mouth and chin" (Hawthorne 253). From

The Minister's Black Veil By Nathaniel Hawthorne

808 words - 3 pages The Minister's Black Veil by Nathaniel Hawthorne Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil" embodies the hidden sins that we all hide and that in turn distance us from the ones we love most. Reverend Hooper dons a black veil throughout this story, and never takes it off. He has discerned in everyone a dark, hidden self of secret sin. In wearing the veil Hooper dramatizes the isolation that each person experiences when

Minister's Black Veil Essays: Masks And Intimacy

1271 words - 5 pages The Minister's Black Veil - Masks and Intimacy        The Minister's Black Veil begins with a young pastor, Mr. Hooper, arriving at church with an ugly black veil covering his face. The people are all dismayed, and wonder why he is wearing a black veil. They are further dismayed and confused, when he refuses to take it off--ever. There is only one person who is not horrified by his black veil--his wife-to-be, Elizabeth. She comes to him