The Clans Of Scotland Essay

642 words - 3 pages

Q1. What has motivated you to chose this particular topic?
A1. The history of the area today known as Scotland has a rich history of expansion, war, and culture. Ever since I was little I have know that my last name, Graham, was of strong Scottish origin. When I was first introduced to Genealogy, the study of ancestral family, I went crazy. I Immediately traced my family back to the European countries of Germany, France, Ireland, Wales, the Netherlands, and England. These places made up a large portion of my heritage, but my Scottish roots outnumbered all the other countries many times over. The majority of the lines of my family tree, including the Grahams, trace back to Scotland. I even had a heritage test that confirmed my findings. This encouraged me to get to know my roots more in depth, and so I began to research the land of the Scots. I soon found that the Grahams come from around Lake ...view middle of the document...

Most clans of Scotland don’t have many clear beginnings, meaning there is no exact answer. Most myths behind the formation of Scotland’s clan system is centralized on the idea of prominent families controlling areas of land in Scotland. Certain families, such as the Campbell’s, Bruce’s, or MacIntosh’s rose to political power. Each clan had a tartan that is intrinsic to themselves. This brings up the question, “What is the importance of tartan, and where did it come from?” The tartans of Scotland originated in the region of Caledonia. Caledonia is what Romans referred to the region of Scotland around 80 AD. They took woven wool skirts, then dyed them into patterns. The tartan evolved into a way for clans to express their patriotism. Finally, I was confused as to, “how are the highland and lowland clans are different?” The obvious answer to this is geography, but there are cultural aspects as well. Lowland clans act more as one unit, and act as the runners of the kingdom of Scotland. Highland clans are very different. They are all little bit more “unruly.” Historically, highland clans view themselves as independent entities. They are the source of the stereotypical feuds you hear constantly about in movies or in history books.
Q3. What did you find most interesting about the information you learned?
A3. There were many interesting pieces of information I learned as I researched the clans of Scotland. Scotland was originally inhabited by a celtic people called the Picts. The Picts inhabited a country called Pictland and operated as one Country, with no clan system. It wasn’t until later that the gaelic Scots came over to the island of Great Britain from Northern Ireland. The Scots slowly conquered Pictland and created a new country called Alba, or Scotland. It was the Scots from Ireland who originally started the clan system.
Q4. What is something you read that contradicts what you thought you knew?
A4. Before reading up on the clan system of Scotland, I initially believed that the clan system has since died out after the Jacobite Rebellion, but it seems that that is not the case.

Find Another Essay On The Clans of Scotland

A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and An Ode Popular Superstitions of Highlands of Scotland

2673 words - 11 pages Comparing Unification in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland        In A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft seeks to abolish repressive, orthodox conventions. She endeavors to abate manners that lacerate our society, that elevate man above woman, that prohibit equal exchange between the sexes. This unequal system of gender roles forms the basis of

Murder in the Castle, an Inside Look at the Death of King Duncan I of Scotland

720 words - 3 pages Murder in the Castle, an Inside Look at the Death of King Duncan I of Scotland Last night, King Duncan I of Scotland was murdered in his chamber. The king was staying at the castle of his Thane, Lord Macbeth, on the night of his murder. King Duncan had been attending a party that Lord Macbeth had arranged for him and his sons. All of Scotland is in mourning for the murder of their beloved king, but everyone wants to know who committed this foul

A Comparison of Shakespeare's MacBeth With the Real MacBeth, King of Scotland

1324 words - 5 pages Macbeth, a play written by William Shakespeare, portrays Macbeth as a kinsman, subject and trusted friend to King Duncan I of Scotland. A trusted friend, that is, until Macbeth has a chance encounter with the “three witches” (Shakespeare) or the “Weird Sisters”. The witches predict that Macbeth will become the next King and that his fellow companion, Banquo, will be the father of a line of kings. A change comes over Macbeth after his

The Royal Bank of Scotland --- breif entire management plan

2164 words - 9 pages Managing OperationsUndoubtedly, RBS managed its resources successfully. Forecasting is one aspect of planning capacity. Its four functions are marketing, operations, HRM and finance. RBS took measures according to these functions in order to plan its capacity. Take the Manufacturing Division and Retail Division (one of the customer-facing divisions) for example. Firstly, RBS used psychometric tests to draw out appropriate staff who were

William Wallace

1228 words - 5 pages need a band of many men to fight off the English army. The English army was run by the ruler of England, who at the time was King Edward the I. King Edward took on a pretty ruthless approach to invading Scotland. William Wallace went from town to town, reaching the highlands and the lowlands to find men who would help defend Scotland. He was able to get men from different clans to unite together as one. William Wallace’s most epic battle was the

Scotland's Referendum 2014

2918 words - 12 pages Viking settlements further south. The fact that the Vikings blended so well with the Scots is not because they were weak, and fighting was one-sided, but because they both had common traits amongst their cultures. Intermarriages between the Scots and Norse men were not uncommon and many Scottish clans can trace their beginnings to Norse-Scot ancestors. This relation between Scotland and the Norse invaders spurred on the trade of shipbuilding, of

Sir William Wallace

1310 words - 6 pages hero. In the 19th century the Scots constructed a monument outside the city of Stirling, and overlooking the scene of Scotland’s victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The Wallace Monument was built to remember how great William Wallace was, and to remember that he was “a Hero of Scotland and a true patriot, had a burning desire for peace and freedom which united the country’s clans, gained the loyalty of its people, struck fear into his

Modern Scotland

990 words - 4 pages Both the Scottish Parliament and Visit Scotland show two different images of modern Scotland. The parliament appeals to the Scottish people and try to improve the Scottish economy. Visit Scotland directed at tourists and is rather stereotypical. They do not convey a true image of modern Scotland. They are trying to appeal to two different audiences but they are making mistakes and this is causing Scotland to suffer. Throughout this essay is

Braveheart: The life of William Wallace – in reality and fiction

1235 words - 5 pages . Eventually, they are forced to strive against the English. Wallace announces this war to the war for independence committee. Once more he asks the clans and every volunteer to go to war. Especially the Scottish aristocrats refuse to fight. When William defeats the English with the Scottish Army, he is created Guardian of Scotland and got permission to call himself “Sir William Wallace”. Even when they give him his aristocratic title, the Scottish

Sir William Wallace

1570 words - 6 pages William Wallace is a national hero. In the 19th century the Scots constructed a monument outside the city of Stirling, and overlooking the scene of Scotland’s victory at the Battle of Stirling Bridge. The Wallace Monument was built to remember how great William Wallace was, and to remember that he was “a Hero of Scotland and a true patriot, had a burning desire for peace and freedom which united the country’s clans, gained the loyalty of its

Hamlet 3

1308 words - 5 pages was Kintail. His second came 13 years later and it gave the MacKenzies, Strathconan, Stratbran, and Strathgarve which had being taken for them in the past. The greatest MacKenzie was the sixth chief Alexander, and there are many romantic stories about him because he was a womanizer. He was also the most powerful chief who lead the MacKenzie's to one of the most powerful clans in Scotland. He had two wives so the eldest of his first marriage

Similar Essays

The Fight For Kingship Of Scotland

1295 words - 6 pages qualities to obtain the kingship of Scotland and keep it. Also, who is the right man for the kingship? All this plays out in this bloodshed full play written by Shakespeare over the fight for the kingship. Trust is a major issue throughout this play, and each king takes a different stance on how they want to deal with this issue. Duncan is overly trustworthy of his men, and believes they will do anything for him. On the other hand, Macbeth does

Women In The Last King Of Scotland

900 words - 4 pages The Last King of Scotland, directed by Kevin MacDonald and based on the novel of the same name by Giles Foden, shapes events from the reign of notorious Ugandan dictator Idi Amin (Forest Whitaker) into a dramatic and attention-grabbing narrative. However, the film, which was praised by critics and garnered a Best Actor win for Whitaker at the Academy Awards, focuses far too much on “sexual conquests of a young white doctor who heads to Uganda in

Explain The Basis Of The Jacobite Movement In Scotland

1995 words - 8 pages the French to help him with leading a rebellion into Scotland.The Clans flocked to support Charles Edward Stuart on his landing, and it was not long before Scotland was under the Jacobite rule. Instead of staying and controlling Scotland, Charles decided he wanted England as well, and made it as far as Derby. The strength of the English was too much and the armies had to fall back. The rebellion along with the Jacobite ideals and beliefs were

One Of The Most Deprived Areas In Scotland

1048 words - 4 pages of concentrating the poorest families within the local community. By 1988, local population had decreased to 5,600, 39% of households composed of single parents and unemployment exceeded 30%. (Scotland.gov.uk 1998) Previous attempts at regeneration in Ferguslie Park had tried but never succeeded. In 1988, Ferguslie Park was included in the launch of the New Life for Urban Scotland programme. A 10 year strategy was established for regeneration