The Handmaid’s Tale And The Veil Of Roses

932 words - 4 pages

Although the Handmaid’s Tale & veil of roses are both novels of fiction, but they can both participate of real life action, each story of a women life differ significantly. Comparison of two different novel’s with similar themes such as escape, love, and freedom.
The Handmaid’s tale and Veil of Roses both inform us on how women were or may be treated in the world we live in. That comes to show, as empowering as women might feel in today’s society there are other women who still pray and fight for their freedom every day. Women may fight for different kinds of freedom from love, rape, prison, a country, a religion, or marriage. It all comes down to a matter of struggle, which can be very ...view middle of the document...

Although she's brutally beaten after the first escape attempt, Moria is determined to get back out. At the end she definitely got out from being a handmaid, but became a tramp, dancing for man with all the power in the republic of Gilead. There is no escape for the handmaids.

As for Veil of Roses Tamila is one of many women who escape a life under many rules, as to how to dress, how to speak, how to walk and who to marry. In the country of Iran women are dress from head to toe only the eyes are revealing. It’s hard for any women to speak their mind about what they want and what their dreams are, Tamila wanted it all. But in the Islamic Republic of Iran, dreams are a dangerous thing for a girl. Knowing they can never come true. they have two choices one which is to choose a husband and get married or continue their education by going to university, Tamila the main character chose to continue university in America. Her dream is to be a photographer, she got the opportunity to run from her country and discover what the American life is all about. She never wanted to return to Iran. Both characters in the novel escape from their present life, trying to find a new introduction.

The handmaid’s tale and veil of roses are comparable with the themes love. The main character in the handmaid’s tale, Offred had loved ones before she became a handmaid. Handmaid names consist of the word “of” followed by the name of the Handmaid’s Commander which is Fred in this case. Offred had a daughter and a husband, as...

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