The Pacific At War World War Ii World War 2 Wwii United States Agianst Japan Navy At War Japanese Military

2464 words - 10 pages

"War: a state of open armed, often prolonged conflict carried on between nations, states or parties."1 War is a familiar concept to everyone in all its harsh brutality, endless chaos, and not always an adequate peaceful end. Some wars are political, some racial, and some just utterly disarray of destruction. In all cases, World War II was all these wars combined to cause what is referred to as the war to end all wars due to the extensive damage caused. World War II was more hectic than the preceding war because there were two major offensives, one in the Pacific area encompassing the islands in the Pacific south east, and the European war.War in the Pacific was extremely dangerous because in order to conduct war in the Pacific a nation had to have a formidable sized fleet of carriers, battleships, and cruisers. One hit could paralyze a ship completely; soldiers on both sides in the Pacific did not have the benefit of land to which they could daringly escape. One either stayed on board or jumped off into the warm waters of the ocean and awaited fate, most of the time in the hands of sharks.One cannot imagine how war is or how it feels unless the experiences are in their possession. Yet all those whom possess this knowledge wish to let it go because the agonizing memories run through their minds time after time. To us they might be just memories of war, but the real war is for the ones living with those memories everyday. Unlike the physical war the recollections never end in peace, they just repeat the horror and carnage over again.December 7, 1941 the Japanese unrepentantly attacked the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard. It was so unexpected that sixteen-year-old John Garcia replied "They're just practicing."2 By the time, his grandmother informed him of the initial attack, so much chaos and confusion had already erupted.An officer came by and asked me to go into the Pennsylvania and try to get the fires out. A bomb had penetrated the marine deck, and that was three decks below. Under that was the magazines: ammunition, powder, shells. I said, "There ain't no way I'm gonna go down there." It could blow up any minute. I was young and sixteen, not stupid, not at sixty-two cents an hour.2This is very significant of the fact that this event was not anticipated to its disastrous consequences. It showed that the United States was unprepared and unorganized as well, to the point that officers were trying to order non-commissioned civilians. To a greater extent unorganized groups surfaced during the attack on Pearl Harbor. Instead of firing anti-aircraft guns at the Japanese planes, sailors grabbed the five-inch guns and initiated shooting the five-inch shells at them.3 Not contemplating the consequences that the shells, with their ten-mile range, would not be effective against the Japanese planes all it did was destroy property and life in Honolulu as it rained five-inch shells from the harbor causing friendly-fire casualties to civilians.War in all its awe and...

Find Another Essay On The Pacific at War World War II World War 2 WWII United States agianst Japan Navy at war Japanese Military

Why the United States got Involved in World War II

1868 words - 7 pages Hitler. Soon after the fall of Berlin (Germany's capital), Germany surrendered leaving only Japan for the Allies to worry about. Many events caused the outbreak of W.W.II, American involvement in W.W.II, and the ending of the war. Nevertheless, there are some events that were more influential in bringing about the start of World War II than others, some events that were more influential in bringing about the United States' involvement in the war than others, and some events were more decisive in the ending of W.W.II. In any case, however, the eighteen events aforementioned events were all immensely significant in their various ways.

Crime rates in the United States during World War II

4594 words - 18 pages to the rise of crimes such as aggravated assault, which jumped from 46.5 in 1939 to 54.8 in 1945. This was most likely caused by overconfidence of the criminals. "Improved economic conditions usually lead to an increase in crimes of violence, such as assault and manslaughter. " (historians.org)"In the United States at least 90 percent of the recorded crimes are the work of males." (historians.org) This statistic did not change during World War II

The Outbreak of World War 2 A Look at Orthodox and Revisionist Theories on the Origins of World War II and Personal Response

2618 words - 10 pages Neville Chamberlain at the Munich conference, and the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour.Hitler's rise to power and his election as Chancellor is a main cause for the outbreak of the Second World War. Hitler's militaristic nature and the extreme right wing nationalism of the Nazi party would undoubtedly strain relations with nations such as the USSR or Germany's main rival, France. Hitler was also a very devout believer in the idea of increased

The United States at Fault for the Cold War

1197 words - 5 pages From when World War II ended in 1945, all the way up to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, the Cold War was the center of attention of international affairs. It was a struggle between the United States and the Soviet Union. From an American view the Cold War was a mostly a war on communism. The US caused and maintained the Cold War, the US is to blame for the Cold War for disparish of the communist Soviet Union in support of the

The Effect of World War II on the Lives of People at Home

8120 words - 32 pages The Effect of World War II on the Lives of People at Home World war two was officially started with the invasion of Poland, September 1939 where the British being an ally of Poland and disagreeing with Hitler’s actions, declared war against Germany. The war lasted for 6 years in Europe until 1945. It managed to involve most of Europe and Asia, America, Canada, Australia, Africa. Debatably more the 30 million perished as

Growing Up During the Holocaust: A Look at the Other Side of World War II

2036 words - 9 pages . It’s a book that deals with the reality of the life that people had to face during Nazi Germany, but in an entertaining way that’s appealing to the young adult audience. Some World War II books can get extremely boring, with little high points in the plot. But young adults can almost relate to Liesel, she has different aspects that appeal to all audiences. Once Germany started to lose conquered land to the east, they were put into a bad

Critical Look at Britain in the Years Following World War II

1418 words - 6 pages In the wake of World War II, a weakened Britain emerged and was faced with many changing realities. Given the rise in post-colonial literature after the war, many historians, such as Ronald Hyam, focus on the nation’s declining imperial power as colonialism was attacked around the world. Others, such as John Callaghan, share a similar idea, but focus on the importance of Britain’s relation to the United States of America (US), and how the US

Evacuation of British Children From Britain's Major Cities at the Beginning of World War II

693 words - 3 pages Evacuation of British Children From Britain's Major Cities at the Beginning of World War II The British government had many reasons for evacuating children from Britain's major cities at the start to of the Second World War. The prime objective of the evacuation was to save the children from being killed by German bombing raids. The government feared that air attacks on main cities were very close, and they wanted the

Women in Combat: The World War II Experience in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, and the Soviet Union

888 words - 4 pages Thousands of men enlisted and were sent to fight during World War II. However, many people are unaware of the role that women played in the war, not only in taking over the jobs that would have previously belonged to men at home, but also in combat. D’Ann Campbell’s article “Women in Combat: The World War II Experience in the United States, Great Britain, Germany, and the Soviet Union” explores this topic. Campbell argues that the role of women

This is a reseach paper on Native American contributions to World War II and the United States' reparations

828 words - 3 pages , WAVES, and Army Nurse Corps. Many American Indians that were unable to enlist in the military flocked to work at war production plants (Morgan 2). After the United States entered World War II, the Iroquois Confederacy immediately allied with the United States by declaring war on Germany (Morgan 1). The Pueblo tribe offered to donate their cars and trucks to the war effort, and the Quapaw tribe donated $1 million to the war effort (Porterfield 1

Of Fog and War: A Comparative Analysis of Two Japanese Bombing Attacks on the United States during WWII

1637 words - 7 pages Of Fog and War: A Comparative Analysis of Two Japanese Bombing Attacks on the United States during WWII Warfare, unfortunately, is an essential part of mankind. It has been witnessed since time immemorial. What is comforting to know, however, is that it does not always end with blood baths, or similar devastation. Sometimes warfare ends with two enemy forces forgiving one another. This happened years after the Lookout Air Raids, when the

Similar Essays

The United States And World War Ii

1397 words - 6 pages Harbor. After this address he gave the term ‘date which will live in infamy’ became associated with the attack of Pearl Harbor. December 7th, 1941 was the day the Untied states official entered World War II. On that day at 6:00 am, The Japanese army and navy unleashed an attack on the Naval base of Pearl Harbor located on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. At the time Japan attacked the United States, the U.S. was a neutral with Japan. “The United States

United States Involvement In World War Ii

1510 words - 6 pages The United State’s direct involvement in World War II officially began as soon as the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor. Prior to that event, America had been providing arms and equipment to England but stopped short of any direct military confrontation with the Axis. The War in the Pacific was considered Asia’s War and the European War was considered a local conflict. US-Japanese relations had become strained in 1941, though America felt secure that

World War Ii: Korematsu V. United States

605 words - 2 pages -American Internment Camps during War World II. The United States feared that where residents of Japanese ancestry lived had to be removed from their homes along the coast and relocated in isolated inland areas. As result President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066, which resulted in the internment of 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry. That was relocation authority was created to administer the assembly centers, relocation centers, and internment

The United States' Treatment Of Japanese Americans During World War Ii

1170 words - 5 pages On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt signed the Executive Order 9066 allowing the military to exclude “any and all persons” from designated areas of the country as needed for national defense. These “any and all persons” were Japanese Americans, 2/3 citizens and 1/3 aliens, and the designated area was the West Coast of the United States. The Executive Order to place the Japanese living in the United States into internment camps was deemed