The Trial Of Madame Caillaux Essay

845 words - 3 pages

The trial of Madame Caillaux and her murder of journalist Henry Calmette symbolized French culture to its core. Edward Berenson combines the trial with French society's attitudes by incorporating courtroom behavior to express Belle Epoque's values and drama to capture the reader's feelings. Although the book is supposed to be about the trial surrounding the murder of Henry Calmette, Berenson primarily uses the courtroom antics of the characters as examples French culture. With each chapter a specific characteristic of French society is explained in detail. However, the main underlying theme of the novel is the importance of gender in Belle Epoque society and how it affected the trial.Berenson expresses gender in terms of their roles in society during this time period. These roles, consequently, are major factors in the case of surrounding the Madame Caillaux trial. The defense tries to exploit French society's belief in the crime passion. The prosecution, on the other hand, wants to portray Henriette Caillaux as a woman of masculinity who could not, therefore, commit a crime based on emotion but rather on premeditation.Berenson adds that because of this obsession with gender roles, men at this time try to prevent the feminist movement from gaining further influence in order to enhance their self-esteem. This obsession with maintaining, or rather rebuilding men's control over women, is brought forth in the trial. For example, Judge Albanel's fixation upon upholding his honor and integrity represents the need for men to assert their masculinity. Not only does Berenson recount the trial behind the murder of Henry Calmette, but he also illustrates Belle Epoque culture in such a way that does not detract from the trial. Even though Berenson shares specifics of French society, these attitudes are represented by the case itself. Therefore, the reasons behind the opinions of the court are justified by explaining society's views. The facts are revealed through real life situations where a modern twenty-first century reader can relate to what is happening even though the book's setting is the early twentieth century. Joseph Caillaux and Berthe Guyden's divorce illustrates this point. Their situation represents the growing efforts of French society "to establish legal divorce". Each chapter devoted to a particular character and his or her situation reinforces this connection between the courtroom drama and real human behavior. Thus, the connection between the trial and society is revealed in a way that the reader can enjoy both the courtroom events and the true historical facts.Another aspect of the novel is the use of irony to...

Find Another Essay On The Trial of Madame Caillaux

The Inevitable Abyss of Madame Bovary

958 words - 4 pages The Inevitable Abyss of Madame Bovary Dr. Satler’s comments: This student’s paper displays the radiance of writing kindled by discriminating reading. His careful attention to words and their subtle tones in context translate into interpretive language that clarifies the subtle shapes of meaning. The abyss that so terrifies Emma in Madame Bovary is reality and the crushing finality of it. The fantasy world that she has constructed from

The Theme of Change in Madame Bovary

905 words - 4 pages The Theme of Change in Madame Bovary       Change is a central theme in the novel Madame Bovary, by Gustave Flaubert, and is key to understanding the character of Emma Bovary. Through parallel events the reader comes to realize that Emma's need for change is the result of the influence her early life had upon her. At the convent Emma is left to develop into an extreme romantic with high hopes for excitement and dreams of sensuous pleasures

The Career and Discoveries of Madame Curie

1098 words - 5 pages Madame Curie Maria Salomea Sklodowska was born on November 7, 1867 in Warsaw, Poland. She is the youngest out of five; Bronislawa, Zosia, Jozef, and Helena. Her parents, Wladyslaw and Bronislawa, were educators who persuaded Maria and her siblings to pursue an education. Her mother was the principal of a local girl school and her father a physics teacher. In 1876, Bronislawa and Zosia got Typhoid fever, which in result caused Zosia death at age

The Concept of Fair Trial

1772 words - 7 pages “The right of a criminal defendant to a fair trial is absolute... The right to a fair trial is one to be enjoyed by the guilty as well as the innocent, for a defendant is presumed to be innocent until proved to be otherwise in a fairly conducted trial,” (Randall v. R. (Cayman Islands), 2002). The concept of fair trial is self-explanatory; it simply means an impartial trial that is executed to grant each party involved in a case their fundamental

The Trial of R. Kelly

788 words - 3 pages According to A Novel Approach to Politics “Questions about the very nature of reality seem to be common in fiction of all sorts.” Especially, The Boondocks, a fictional cartoon, uses satire to describe real events that happen in society. The episode I tuned into was “The Trial of R. Kelly”, which explained how R. Kelly won his trial and the views of the people about his case. In the episode, the people outside the court house showed different

The Trial of a Slave

800 words - 4 pages The trial of a Slave 1850 there was a law that was against rape in the state of Missouri. This particular law prohibited any woman to be taken unlawfully by force against her will, menace or duress, and compel her to be defiled. The state of Missouri had an additional law which permitted women to use any deadly weapon or force to protect herself from rape which justified homicide. Although for Celia this law did not apply to her because she was

Madame Bovary and The House of the Spirits

1467 words - 6 pages Gustave Flaubert of Madame Bovary and Isabel Allende of The House of the Spirits both manipulate elements of genre, dialogue, and style in relation to suspense in order to comment on the romantic ideas of destiny and fate. While they both use these techniques in relation to suspense and anticipation, Flaubert minimizes the importance of fate while Allende seeks to promote it. Flaubert builds suspense for a large amount of time and suddenly

The Beauty of the Mundane in Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary

1600 words - 6 pages The Beauty of the Mundane in Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary In Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, it is difficult to know what to think of Monsieur Binet and his lathe. His constant devotion to such an unrewarding pursuit would seem to act as the bourgeois backdrop to Emma Bovary’s quest for eternal passion and excitement, a polar opposite with which Emma can stand in sharp contrast. However, it turns out that Binet and his lathe have

Madame Bovary By Gustave Flaubert:An Analysis Of The Characters

1602 words - 7 pages Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert:An Analysis of The CharactersMadame Bovary, written by Gustave Flaubert was considered very controversial when it was first published. The novel was actually tried in a court of justice for obscenity, because it was alleged to be concerned with adultery and contains situations and allusions that shocked the prudish philistine government of Napoleon III. It was cited for "offenses against morality and religion

Inherit The Wind : “Trial Of The Century”

836 words - 4 pages There were many things that happened during the1920's. Some of them were inventions. Automobiles, clothes, war, and many more happened during this time. It was basically a time of change. One of the well-recorded documents in the 1920's was about the story of two lawyers fighting over the basis of ho man came to be upon the earth. This case came to be "the most explosive trial of the century". The name of the book is Inherit the Wind. There are

The Death of Emma Bovary in Madame Bovary

1220 words - 5 pages Gustave Flaubert’s Madame Bovary is the detailed tale of the upbringing of a common French farm girl and her experiences as a member of the Bourgeoisie social party. At the end of the novel, Emma, the main character, decides to commit suicide through the use of arsenic because of the large amount of debt she acquired through purchases of gifts for her infidelity partners. Occurring in chapter eight of the last section, the novel continues with

Similar Essays

The Revenge Of Madame Defarge Essay

1059 words - 5 pages Revolution. Madame Defarge, a revolutionary in the French Revolution, is a prime example of a character seeking revenge who ends up taking things too far. While she has good reason for seeking revenge on the Evrémonde family, and her want to overthrow aristocracy is understandable, Madame Defarge takes her revenge too far. With her ruthless killing of innocent people, and her burning desire for bloodshed, Defarge is a clear example of the darker side

The Trial Of God Essay

1119 words - 4 pages Elie Wiesel’s the Trial of God represents the age-old question: how can a righteous God allow evil and suffering? Written as a play based on a real event, Wiesel tries to capture the myriad of emotions and theological arguments that were present. Though the trial, in Wiesel’s play, takes place during the seventeenth-century many cultural aspects overlap with twentieth-century Europe and World War II. Similarities between Wiesel’s fictional

The Trial Of Socrates Essay

1100 words - 4 pages The Trial of Socrates The trial of Socrates is an excellent source of events during the period in which Socrates lived and died. Athens was a democratic city with much pride in their freedom. Especially their freedom of speech. Socrates was a political philosopher who did not agree with these freedoms provided by the Athenic democracy. However, it is his trial in which both the democracy of Athens and Socrates himself show their

The Trial Of Socrates Essay

1918 words - 8 pages The Trial of SocratesAuthor: I.F. StoneI.F. Stone a self described civil libertarian set out to write a book about freedom of speech; his research naturally led him back to ancient Athens, the earliest society where freedom of thought and expression flourished. In studying a society so renowned for the afore mentioned freedoms one cannot ignore what appears to be a total contradiction to all that Athens stood for, the trial and execution of